Volume 23 (2021)

Coyote Papers 23 (2021) served as the proceedings for Arizona Linguistics Circle 14. ALC14 was held on October 17, 2020. The theme for ALC14 was "Language Technology and Media", and our invited speakers included Sonja Lanehart (University of Arizona), Ellen Riloff (University of Utah), and Gareth Roberts (University of Pennsylvania). These proceedings are single-blind peer reviewed.

 

Full Volume

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Table of Contents

You can access the frontmatter and Table of Contents here: [download]

 

Articles

Brown, Megan M. (2021). CLI and Cognitive Control in the L3 Initial State[download]

This paper examines the degree to which individual cognitive differences may serve as a predictor of early success in L3 German grammatical gender and number acquisition. I call for a more extensive consideration of such factors in L3 research, which may complicate previous models of the L3 initial state.

 

Catasso, Nicholas (2021). A German expletive gone unnoticed? Some notes on (obligatorily) left-peripheral so[download]

The paper investigates a hitherto unexplored function of an originally adverbial item (so) in German. The distributional and referential properties of this element suggest that unlike some of its polysemous counterparts in the language, “this” so can be analyzed as an expletive contributing to an explanatory reading of the utterance.

 

Nelson-Greene, Pearl, Johnson, Isaac, and Duncan, Philip T. (2021). A new category for Kiksht ideophones. [download]

This article investigates the morphosyntax of ideophones in Kiksht, an Indigenous language spoken at the Warm Springs Reservation (Oregon). Based primarily on an analysis of ideophones in Sapir (1909)'s Wishram Texts, we show that Kiksht ideophones display a unique constellation of properties, setting them apart in terms of syntactic categorization.

 

Hiba B., Ibrahim (2021). Identity investment in the pedagogy of identity texts: A critical review. [download]
 
This paper presents a critical analysis of existing action research using the pedagogy of identity texts. By highlighting the issues of authority in instruction, non-participation, and identity negotiation in intercultural reflection, the paper promotes a need for more sophisticated tools when examining the critical relationship between identity investment and critical literacy practices in the communication spaces learners navigate today.
 
 
Krug, Andreas (2021). The FLEECE and GOOSE Vowels in Tyneside English: Accent Levelling and Morphological Conditioning[download]

For some time now, Tyneside speakers have been reported to use monophthongs morpheme-internally and diphthongs morpheme-finally for the lexical sets fleece and goose (e.g., Watt 1998). This sociophonetic study of Tyneside English shows that fleece and goose  are now largely monophthongal both morpheme-internally and morpheme-finally, which is interpreted as evidence for accent levelling.

 

Law, Ka Fai (2021). The Pragmatic Implication of Speakers’ Affirmative Attitude in Cantonese Utterance Particle Ge3[download]

In this paper, I investigate the pragmatic implication of the Cantonese utterance particles ge3. I propose that ge3 conveys both epistemic modality and evidentiality under certain contexts. The context of the examples in this study provides cues indicating that speakers’ access to their prior knowledge strengthens their epistemic attitude.

 

Yi, Irene (2021). The Feminization of French Profession Nouns[download]

This paper critically examines the history of French language teaching and usage of grammatical gender. Upheld by the French Academy, rigid grammatical gender often reflected sexist societal views--most notably in the lack of grammatically feminine forms of French profession nouns. Feminist linguistic movements have sought to change this.

 

Volume Summary: 

Nitschke, Remo, Damian Y. Romero Diaz, Gabriela De La Cruz Sánchez, John W. W. Powell, Kristina Mihajlović, Luis A. Irizarry-Figueroa, George-Michael Pescaru, Florian Hafner (eds.), Coyote Papers 23: Proceedings of the Arizona Linguistics Circle 14